No one really likes ads.

 

Skillfully designed to mold our perception in favor of the advertiser, they tend to feel inherently invasive, consuming our precious time and attention. Yet, lacking viable alternatives, advertisement has been largely regarded by most of us as a tolerable nuisance, allowing us to access high production-value content without having to pull our wallets out.

And indeed, in the sense of investing money so that a wide audience can hear what you have to say, advertising is, by all means, a legitimate and useful practice; one that is inherently interwoven with the Attention Economy models Synereo has developed.

The problem begins when one’s role as an advertiser grants them unproportionate influence over the kinds of content that can or cannot be produced, effectively controlling which conversations are to be promoted, restricted or prevented altogether. This is an issue that has been plaguing broadcast television almost since its inception, but that has spared the freer roaming grounds of the Internet until recently, when most venues coagulated into giant, centrally managed conglomerates not entirely dissimilar from those of the previous era.

Beyond outright censorship, content that manages to pass through the madmen filter often finds itself becoming a reflection of corporate-speak, dumbed down to a much lesser version of itself. Controversial, complex and thought-provoking material does a very bad job at selling soda and washing powder, and has to be augmented with cheap cliffhangers and simplified messages to fit with the advertisers’ desired format.

In this sense, the “free” content generated by this centralized-form advertising comes at a hefty price.

In the latest YouTube scandal, a host of heavyweight advertisers have pulled their ads from the platform, protesting the fact that their services were advertised on channels discussing controversial subjects. YouTube reacted swiftly by heavily restricting monetization options for anyone seeming ever so slightly out of line, and even taking entire channels off air without explanation or prior notice.

Allegedly targeting hate speech and incitement, the new policy quickly revealed itself as directed against anything that might badly affect the mood of YouTube’s biggest corporate clients.

This seeming overreaction on the side of a giant like Google’s YouTube only highlights the shakiness of the foundations of even well-established channels. UGC creation is a hard and often ungrateful job. The ones among us who have tried their luck in this field know how much dedication, investment of time, resources, and entrepreneurial skill are involved in the creation of good and unique content. Having the vested interests of advertisers and platform operators stacked between you and your audience doesn’t better the situation, to say the least.

The absurdity of a reality in which venues with hundreds of thousands of subscribers, producing top-notch, high-quality content cannot make ends meet emphasizes the need for an alternative. Creators shouldn’t find themselves having to compromise on authenticity and artistic truth, especially not when they’re so overwhelmingly endorsed by a large and committed audience.   

Liberating Creativity with Synereo Qrator

One way to mitigate the dependency on advertiser funding and their agendas is the establishment of direct payment channels between creators and their audience, as tipping services such as Patreon are out to do. However, these services aren’t seamlessly integrated with our direct internet experience and provide little incentive to participate on the consumer side.

Synereo’s Qrator refines and extends this mechanism and takes a more holistic approach, one that may push this economy to the next level by providing an environment that follows you around on your web adventures and allows you to engage with content in ways that benefit you, your social environment and content creators alike.

Amplifying content with Synereo’s Qrator isn’t just a form of tipping or a voluntary payment for information received for free. Amplifying means teaming up with a content creator and becoming their partner.

After choosing the desired amount of AMPs to be invested in a piece of content, Qrator generates a unique link, associated with your account, which you can then share on social networks or otherwise distribute as you see fit.

Your friends and followers, clicking on the link, will be directed to this content embedded in the Qrator site and presented with the option to Amplify and share it as well. If they choose to do so, a share of the AMPs invested by them will be credited to you and to the person you discovered the content through, while a significant part will be handed to the original content creator. The more AMPs you invest in the content, and the more traction you create, the higher will be your reward from future Amplifications.

This way, content creators can derive income from their work, while people who are on the lookout for high-quality content are incentivized to match it with new audiences.

From the Creator side of the game, there’s the ability to place a bounty on their content – collected by users who can distribute it successfully, bringing views, subscriptions, and Amplifications. This allows the Creator to break the boundaries of his organic reach, Amplifying their work in the traditional Synereo sense.

With this, we envision a new form of relationship between Creators and their audience, one based on participation, mutuality, and fairness. With Qrator moving into its next, decentralized phase, these principles will become even more pronounced and set the stage for a new form of decentralized economy.

To learn more about Synereo Qrator, visit here and sign up to our newsletter. The beta will go live in June, and we would be thrilled to have you with us.

 

We appreciate your attention,

— The Synereo Team

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